Starting The Year With Compassion

I hope you have been enjoying the season – I have! I will not make excuses for not posting for the past several days. It’s the holidays, and I am somewhat busy. In future years, perhaps I will have a way to post things in my absence, but that is not yet part of my M.O. There was a time when I would have berated myself for falling behind in my responsibilities. But not this time. After all, I have not been able to read the blogs to which I personally subscribe during the past couple of weeks, so maybe you’re not missing mine either. So I’m going to cut myself some slack today. Which leads me to today’s topic.

I painted at a Christmas Tea, and enjoyed all sorts of holiday activities.

I painted at a Christmas Tea, and enjoyed all sorts of holiday activities.

I posted not long ago on the topic of weight issues. (Click here to see that post.) I tried to explain that this is not my area of expertise, and that I will not be bringing it up often. However, I have been giving a series of workshops with fellow health coach, Erin Statter, and our January topic is weight management. I also happen to know a few folks who have wrestled with these types of struggles for many years, so I’ve been asking them to enlighten me a bit.

I want to learn what’s behind weight struggles, because I keep hearing that it’s not really about the weight, first and foremost. I have said many times that we are all unique, and that holds true for this area, too. Still, there are some common themes I keep hearing. Like so many aspects of health, people seem to usually know what they “should do” or “might try.” What is it that keeps us from doing something that we sort of want to do? What we know is good?

My son, Joel, made this angel from marshmallow and a cup.

My son, Joel, made this angel from marshmallow and a cup.

There are a few different answers to these questions that seem plausible, but again, there is a common theme. I recently picked up a little book called, “Eating With Fierce Kindness” by Sasha T. Loring. I’m not finished with it, but so far, I like it and it reinforces some of what I heard as a health coaching student last year.

What I’m hearing so far from this book is that we are hard on ourselves, and often do not treat ourselves with as much kindness or compassion as we would a friend. Learning to be kind to ourselves by doing what we need to do to care for our bodies is a first step for some of us in coming back to a state of health, which can also lead to increased ability to maintain healthy weight.

I have made this wonderful & salubrious breakfast for the past several Christmases.

I have made this wonderful & salubrious breakfast for the past several Christmases.

Does this ring true for you? It does for me, even though I have not had a great difficulty with weight. I have kept from gaining too much mostly because it hurt to eat for so many years – not through virtue or good self-care. Yet even in my case, I did come to a healthier weight once I began to take better care of myself.

So, in the spirit of kindness to myself, I shall not feel guilty about enjoying the holidays, even though it meant missing a couple of blog posts. I am not sorry. (That is so hard to say!)

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1 Comment

  1. I think it’s more fun living with a woman who doesn’t feel guilty. (Not that anyone should feel guilty about feeling guilty…)

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